Rock climbing at Goregaon

Imagine climbing up a vertical rock face, using just your bare hands and legs. Imagine looking down from the summit of this mountain, right in the middle of a busy city!

Yes, imagination has no limits, but here is one activity that steps out of imagination into real life.

Thanks to Poonam Kurani, a few homeschooled kids got to do rock climbing at Goregaon! They have an outdoor as well as an Indoor wall to climb. All standard safety precautions are taken, and the climbers are always directed by skilled climbing instructors who also hold the rope which loops from their hands to around the top of the summit and onto your harness.


This massive rock structure is where the actual rock climbing is done.

It stands amidst spacious greens in the campus of a school here.

It is dedicated to the famous mountain climber Arun Samant who hails from this area.


This is the memorial erected at the foot of the rock to Shri Arun Samant.


Before the climb, safety harness is fitted on the climbers by the Climbing Instructor

After that the children started their climb up the huge rock, which has specially designed footholds and handholds just like on a real mountain face.

]

Looking for and shifting balance, pulling up by using hands and legs, a great form of exercise too!


Soon our boys and girl were clambering up, searching for places to hold and push themselves up to the top.


Kids in action


Scaling the summit


Nearing the summit


The kids simply did not want to stop, in spite of their aching muscles. After they finished climbing they could rappel down, safely protected by the ropes.

All in all a very enjoyable activity, suited for young and old alike.

The timings of the place are from 7 PM onwards, and Tuesdays are closed. Charges are also very reasonable, less than a dollar J and you can climb as many times as you want.

Advertisements

Eligibility for SSC as a Private Candidate

 

Some parents have been asking about Homeschooled students giving the SSC state board exams at the tenth level as a private candidate. The Goa board has put this up:

 

Eligibility of Private candidates for SSC Examination.-

 


 
 

(1) A person who has pursued specified course of studies privately and has completed the practicals for the subjects involving practical work prescribed for Std. VIII to X in any recognised Secondary School at the time of application for examination shall be admitted to secondary school certificate examination as a private candidate subject to the fulfilment of the following conditions,-

 
 

(a) He/ She has been a resident of the State of Goa for not less than two years prior to the date of commencement of S.S.C Examination for which he/ she desires to appear.

   However the deficiency, if any, in the period of two years residence in the State of Goa may be condoned by the Chairman on genuine grounds.

 
 

   (b)He/ She was not on the roll of any recognised secondary school of the State during the academic year preceding the date of examination for which he/she desires to appear.

 
 

   (c) He/She must have completed the age of 17 years not later than the 1st   March of that academic year in case of the examination to be held in March and not later than 1st October of the next academic year in case of the examination to be held in October. The date of birth declared by him/her in the form of application shall be supported by authentic document. 

 
 

   (d) Not withstanding anything contained in (a),  (b),  and  (c)  above, –

 
 

      (i) A candidate being a citizen of India who has been a regular student of a secondary school overseas and who has completed the course of studies for an examination equivalent to the secondary school certificate examination of this Board may be permitted to appear at SSC Examination as a private candidate.

 
 

      (ii) A candidate sent as a regular student (i.e.  after having undergone the specified course of studies and kept the specified minimum attendance at a recognised institution) but failing at the corresponding examination equivalent to corresponding S.S.C. examination of this Board, may be permitted to appear at the Examination as a private candidate provided that such a candidate has not joined any secondary school since his/her failure at the other examination concerned:

 
 

   Provided that it shall be competent for the Board to debar an applicant involved in malpractices to secure permission to appear at the examination as a private candidate under clause  (1)  above,  from applying for permission to appear for the Examination, for a period of two years from the month and year of the Examination for which permission is sought,  even if such a candidate is otherwise eligible and further forfeit the enrolment fee if already paid and cancel the enrolment certificate, if already issued.  

           
 

      (2) A candidate applying for S.S.C. examination privately shall complete the course of practicals through a recognised school and submit a certificate from the head of the institution to that effect, while submitting the application for admission to examination.

     
 

      (3) A person who has pursued his/her studies and fulfilling above conditions shall apply to the Board in specified form along with specified fees and relevant documents to enrol himself/herself as a private candidate.

 
 

      (4) The applicant shall state in writing that he/she is not undergoing rustication imposed by any statutory Board of examination or University in India or any other examination authority at the time of submission of application for enrolment.

 
 

      (5) An enrolment certificate shall be issued by the Board to a person eligible to appear for S.S.C. examination as a private candidate.

 
 

      (6) The person who has been enrolled as a private candidate for S.S.C. examination shall apply for admission to the said examination in specified form alongwith the required documents and the fees specified by the Board.

 
 

      (7) The person who has been enrolled as a private candidate shall be exempted from offering school assessment based subjects for S.S.C. examination.

       
 

    (8) The private candidates shall not be eligible for award of prizes or scholarships

Thank you Balamurugan Ramalingam for this link. http://www.gbshse.gov.in/rule17.html from the Goa Board of Secondary and Higher Secondary Education website

 

High Definition Videos

HD, Ultra High HD, what next? Are we running out of superlatives as we try to name the increase in our movie’s Video resolution? And are we even beginning to match the resolution of our eyes?

High Definition:

Those of us who remember the 1990’s and 2000’s will recall that for seeing home videos, DVD was the big thing, with the best resolution possible. DVD shows an image with 720X480.

As I write this article in 2013, 4k is the new big thing in display tech, and it’s coming to a big screen living room TV near you.

Today’s 1920 x 1080 resolution Full HD TVs present us with an image of around 2 megapixels, but this new generation of screens delivers an 8 megapixel image from hi-res cameras.

With new Ultra HD 4K TVs arriving this year from the big TV brands, it will soon become a format for both broadcast TV and Blu-ray.

What is 4K?

Technically speaking, 4K denotes a very specific display resolution of 4096 x 2160. This is the resolution of all 4K recordings, though many people use 4K to refer to any display resolution that has roughly 4000 horizontal pixels.

Ultra HD TVs have a resolution slightly lower than that – 3840 x 2160. That’s exactly four times higher than the full HD resolution of 1920 x 1080.

Many current movie cameras already film above 4K resolutions, for example the RED Epic which can film at a 5K resolution of 5120 x 2700 and the Sony F65 which films at 8192 x 4320 (8K).


This camera costs over Rs 11 Lakhs in Indian Rupees for recording 4 K videos, not counting the recurring costs.

High definition comes in two flavours: 720p (HD ready) and 1080p (Full HD), both of which offer more picture information than the standard definition formats. The more pixels that make up an image, the more detail you see – and the smoother the appearance of curved and diagonal lines. Ultra HD just takes that on to the next level.

A high pixel count also enables images to go larger before they break up, which suits the trend to bigger TVs. Ultra HD is already making big inroads into the world of digital cinema; almost all major Hollywood movies and TV shows are filmed in 4K – or even 5K.

What is Super Hi-Vision?

There’s another spanner in the works in the shape of Super Hi-Vision, an 8K format created by Japan’s national broadcaster NHK. It was trialled extensively at the London 2012 Olympics by the BBC, but doesn’t appear to have much chance of becoming a bona fide format just yet. It’s certainly one to watch; at double the frame rate of HD (at 120fps) and with a 7680 x 4320 pixel resolution (that’s around 32 megapixels), Super Hi-Vision demos have featured stunning 22.2 surround sound, too, thanks to twin subwoofers each the size of a small car.

Technically Super Hi-Vision also comes under the umbrella of the Ultra HD specification, which could store-up problems for future; how will anyone be able to explain the difference? Super-Ultra HD, anyone? Mega HD?

So you need very expensive cameras to capture these so called Ultra High def videos and images, and you need the proper display to see these Ultra High definition 4 K videos.

Now let us switch to Human Biology:


If the human eye was a digital camera, how many megapixels would it have?

Clarkvision does the calculations.

The answer: 576 megapixels.

Most current digital cameras have 5-20 megapixels, and the latest ‘Ultra High Definition’ goes upto 32 Megapixels.

We are still a long long way from matching our incredible human eye’s resolution. Of course the eye has many other differences from manmade cameras. That will be another topic altogether. For now let us concentrate on resolution.

How did the human eye get such an impressive resolution?

As I looked at the net, I was quite taken aback to see some sites that claimed that all this super high resolution machinery of the human eye just ‘evolved’. 

To me the human eye looks plainly to be a highly intelligent design! Who designed our eye?

Surely not random chance, as Evolutionists blindly believe? Could it be a mystical ‘Force’? Or possibly a Committee or pantheon of ‘gods’?

I mean, either one has to be extremely dumb or willfully self-deceiving to even think that our latest 4K cameras could just have evolved from the earlier generation of cameras.

Evolution theory is one of the greatest hoaxes shoved down the throats of our innocent kids in school under the garb of ‘science’ when it is not really science, and that too while these children are too young to even question it. .

The designer, at least to my mind, has to be one very intelligent personal being.

Who could even think of designing and bringing into existence our wonderful eye?

There is one who has claimed responsibility for designing my eye and yours.

The one who made my eye and yours says this: Your eye is a lamp, lighting up your whole body. If you live wide-eyed in wonder and belief, your body fills up with light. If you live squinty-eyed in greed and distrust, your body is a dank cellar.

Keep your eyes open, your lamp burning, so you don’t get musty and murky.
(Luke 11:35)


Photography workshop for Homeschoolers

How to use lights in Photography? What is Product photography? These and many other questions were answered for us by Radha and her mom, Supriya Raj Joshi, at the Photography workshop conducted by them at their home-cum-studio at Dadar on the 18th of August 2013.

Seventh Sense Studio Photography:

Radha started the session with a short video presentation by an expert and his demonstration of different photographs using different sources and angles of lights.

 

 

 

 

After this she did a step by step tutorial on lights, their importance, different types of lights available and the positions in which we can use them.

 

She also explained about aperture and shutter, two basic settings of any camera that give creative flexibility.

Mark holding the diffuser cum reflector


Radha showing the strobe light and flash


Supriya demonstrating the diffuser with LED box light.

 

After this we were shown the products, a wide variety of them, from which each participant chose three items to shoot, with accessories of their choice too.

 


Products to be shot…

Then we had a hands on demonstration on setting up a studio right there at her home!

 

The children were divided into two groups and timed as they unboxed the studio light stand, the light [strobe and flashlight] and umbrella cover. They were also shown a foldable diffuser, two types of reflectors and a black light absorber.


A stand was also assembled on which draping of the background was done.

 


Mark shot a portrait of me too!

 


My son Mark is very camera shy


Mark selected this product shoot

 

Each child then got a chance to set their product in the studio, experiment with different lighting, exposure and aperture settings, and click as many as they wanted. Then they had to choose one for each product for the final discussion.


This one is Mark’s own creation

After this there was a fashion shoot for which we had three exotic models with variety of designer dresses.


Shooting the models

These photographs were also displayed at the end of the shoot, amidst much amazement and joy J


Sumptous snacks, juices, dinner and icecream were also provided, since the program ended only at 1030 pm!


Thank you Supriya, her supportive husband Raj Joshi, and their kids Radha and Malvika for this unique and wonderful opportunity!


Photography workshop for Homeschoolers

How to use lights in Photography? What is Product photography? These and many other questions were answered for us by Radha and her mom, Supriya Raj Joshi, at the Photography workshop conducted by them at their home-cum-studio at Dadar on the 18th of August 2013.

Seventh Sense Studio Photography:

Radha started the session with a short video presentation by an expert and his demonstration of different photographs using different sources and angles of lights.

 

 

 

 

After this she did a step by step tutorial on lights, their importance, different types of lights available and the positions in which we can use them.

 

She also explained about aperture and shutter, two basic settings of any camera that give creative flexibility.

Mark holding the diffuser cum reflector


Radha showing the strobe light and flash


Supriya demonstrating the diffuser with LED box light.

 

After this we were shown the products, a wide variety of them, from which each participant chose three items to shoot, with accessories of their choice too.

 


Products to be shot…

Then we had a hands on demonstration on setting up a studio right there at her home!

 

The children were divided into two groups and timed as they unboxed the studio light stand, the light [strobe and flashlight] and umbrella cover. They were also shown a foldable diffuser, two types of reflectors and a black light absorber.


A stand was also assembled on which draping of the background was done.

 

Mark shot a portrait of me too!

 


My son Mark is very camera shy


Mark selected this product shoot

 

Each child then got a chance to set their product in the studio, experiment with different lighting, exposure and aperture settings, and click as many as they wanted. Then they had to choose one for each product for the final discussion.


This one is Mark’s own creation

After this there was a fashion shoot for which we had three exotic models with variety of designer dresses.


Shooting the models

These photographs were also displayed at the end of the shoot, amidst much amazement and joy J


Sumptous snacks, juices, dinner and icecream were also provided, since the program ended only at 1030 pm!


Thank you Supriya, her supportive husband Raj Joshi, and their kids Radha and Malvika for this unique and wonderful opportunity!