Don’t waste time, Doctors say

Heart attack to hospital takes 5 hours in Mumbai

Doctors To Try & Cut Down Time Taken In City [Adapted from a front page article dated May 25 2014 : The Times of India (Mumbai)]

With three million cases every year, heart attack may be the commonest grave ailment in India. But Indians seem to be dimly aware of its calling card—be it the sudden pain in the chest, upper back or jaw—and often don’t react appropriately. A shocking 95% of heart attack patients take public transport to reach hospital. And, many of them reach after six hours—or over 380 minutes—of the first symptoms, found an all-India study.

Cardiologist Dr Prafulla Kerkar, who heads KEM Hospital’s cardiology department, said barely 10% of heart

attack patients in the city reach the hospital within the golden hour. The golden hour is the crucial period in which medical treatment can prevent permanent damage to the heart’s muscles.

“A study among 350 of our heart attack patients showed that 10% reached the hospital 12 hours after the attack. By this time, the advantages of restoring blood flow are lost,” said Dr Kerkar. The majority of the patients took a median time of five hours, which is twice as long as it takes in the West.

It is to reduce this time lag between the appearance of symptoms and hospitalization that a handful of cardiologists have come together to form a not-forprofit organization called STEMI India.

Three years ago, STEMI India brought together doctors, hospitals and ambulance providers in Coimbatore and Chennai to spread awareness about heart attacks and ensure that patients got treated within the golden hour. They have succeeded in reducing the average symptom-to-hospitalization time to less than three hours or 170 minutes so far.

Next weekend, the STEMI India group of which Dr Kerkar is a member will hold its first training programme in Mumbai at Powai. “Over 800 doctors from Maharashtra, Goa, Gujarat and Madhya Pradesh will attend it,” said course director Dr Rajesh Rajani, cardiologist from Hinduja Hospital, Mahim.

“The message is that the longer you take to report to a hospital after a heart attack, the higher the chance that you are left a cardiac cripple who may well need repeated hospitalizations later on,” added Dr Rajani. It is now well established that patients who are given immediate medical treatment–say, a blood thinner or clot buster–may not suffer any long-term effects of a heart attack.
Many hospitals and nursing homes in Mumbai, though, still don’t give a clot-buster to a patient who comes in with suspected heart attack, say doctors. “They refer the patient to a bigger hospital without even providing streptokinase injection that can dissolve blood clots that caused the heart attack,” said Dr Kerkar. Ashok Hospital is one of the few Hospitals that give this vital clot busting drug, and Dr. S. P. Mathew encourages other Hospitals around to do the same.




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Father of the nation

Being a father is a huge responsibility. How huge? Bigger than any position the world may bestow! Are you sure, some may ask.

Here is what came in the news today:

A British auction house has put on sale three explosive letters written in June 1935, revealing Mahatma Gandhi’s deep concerns over the behaviour of his eldest son Harilal.

You should know that your problem has become much more difficult for me even than our national freedom” Gandhi says.

Mohandas Karamchand [Mahatma] Gandhi was the leader of India’s freedom struggle, where he used non-violence as the means to resist British rule in India in the 1900’s. He is now called the Father of the Nation, and his image is on the currency notes of India, called the Rupee.

Figure 1 Mahatma Gandhi Father of the Nation of India

These letters reveal the huge impact his son’s behavior was having on him, an impact bigger even than the issue of freedom for the entire Indian sub-continent, which is now three countries with 20% of the World’s population.

As parents this is a lesson we need to take very very seriously.

Dead Dad or Dad to be, however important your job or business or even Title may be, ultimately if you have not been a father to your own children, everything else will be in vain.

Over 3000 years ago it was written in the Book of Proverbs [19:13] A foolish son brings disgrace to his father. And (Pro 17:25)

Foolish children bring sorrow to their father and pain to their mother.

As parents the most important job you can have is to bring up children who are wise. Take it very seriously, dear friend. The time you have with your children will soon pass away, but the impact you can make on their lives is eternal.

 

You too can help to catch corrupt officials

ACB [Anti-Corruption Bureau] trapped 508 officials in 4 months in Mumbai, India

City Police Chief, State Dept Heads List Action Plan To Curb Graft, reports the Times of India

Prafulla Marpakwar TNN 14th May 2014
Mumbai: A deputy collector, a public works [PWD] Executive Engineer, a senior Police Inspector, and a Principal of a leading college were among the 508 public servants trapped by the anti-corruption bureau (ACB) in 375 graft cases in the first four months of 2014. Significantly, in the entire last year, the ACB had arrested 281 erring officials in 216 cases.
According to ACB records, the highest number of erring officials caught this year was from the state home department (87), followed by the revenue department (79), municipal corporations (25), state electricity distribution company (16) and land records (11). More shocking was the fact that a few senior Police Inspectors were caught taking bribes in police stations itself.

 

Figure 1 Now you can curb corruption easily


Admitting that the data was worrying, Mumbai police commissioner Rakesh Maria said he was determined to end the menace. “I had a meeting with all deputy, additional and joint police commissioners, and have drafted a comprehensive action plan to take on the erring officials. The results will be visible in a time-bound period,” he said. “We have prepared a list of the erring officers. We will counsel them and take action against them. But if there is no improvement, we ourselves will submit the list to the ACB for further action.”
Maria said all deputy, additional and joint police commissioners have also been asked to personally monitor sensitive cases, where there is scope for corruption. “In cases where an officer can use his discretion on whether or not to arrest the accused, there is scope for corruption. We will monitor all such cases,” Maria said.
An IPS official said that owing to the proactive role played by the ACB, led by IPS officer Praveen Dixit, there was “alertness in all walks of life”. “Social activists are knocking at the doors of the ACB and the results are visible,” he said.

 



Additional chief secretary (revenue) Swadhin Kshatriya said even the revenue department has drafted a strategy to curb corruption. “We have worked out an action plan to provide a corruption-free administration,” he said, adding that more emphasis is being given on maximum utilization of information technology. “All services will be available online, as a result, there will be less scope for corruption.”
Kshatriya said as there was scope for irregularities in land records, they have been completely digitized. “We have simplified rules and set a time bound disposal for all pending revenue cases. We are set to bring e-governance at all levels.”
Food and Drug Administration commissioner Mahesh Zagade said they have taken measures to reduce corruption at all levels. “Our entire administration has been digitized and all services are available online. We are implementing all the legislation in letter and spirit, as a result, there is less scope for lower-level officials to indulge in illegal activities,” he said, adding that if citizens stop giving bribes, corruption will automatically end.

 


 


Drinking water or Sewage?

Civic body faces takeover if Ulhas River remains polluted

 

This is really shocking. Does the Municipality and Maharashtra Pollution Control Board [MPCB] have to be told to do this? Drinking water is a basic requirement for everybody. What is stopping them from destroying he life of millions of innocent people? I am glad that my friend and fellow activist Stalin Dayanand has taken up this vital issue through his NGO Vanashakti.

 

TIMES NEWS NETWORK

14th May 2014 The Times of India

 

Figure 1 Untreated waste dumped into rivers


Mumbai: The Ulhasnagar Municipal Corporation (UMC) was on Tuesday warned by the Pune bench of the National Green Tribunal (NGT) that it will have to stop discharging untreated sewage and effluents into the drinking water source of Kalyan-Dombivli.
The tribunal gave three months to the municipal corporation to clean up its act, failing which “it would be constrained to direct the secretary, urban development department to exercise powers under the Maharashtra Municipal Corporation Act to control the corporation and deal with the problems of pollution in the area”.
NGO Vanshakti had filed an appeal before the NGT to restore the Ulhas river, which was seeing discharge of untreated effluents from MIDC industrial estates, seriously affecting the health of people in Ambernath, Badlapur, Ulhasnagar, Kalyan-Dombivli and elsewhere.

 

Figure 2 Criminal discharge of effluents into water bodies


The NGT observed that information provided by the Maharashtra Pollution Control Board showed there was no sewage treatment plant (STP) provided by the Badlapur Municipal Council.
The NGT order read: “It also appears that Ulhasnagar Municipal Corporation, has provided STP of very low capacity, which does not take care of sewage generated….”
The tribunal said in view of the submission by the MIDC that the process of laying pipelines in the sea-bed to discharge effluents would take time, it directed the UMC to divert Khemni nala to avoid discharge of sewage and effluent in the river or water bodies.

 


The Ulhas river sees discharge of untreated sewage and effluents

IGCSE students applying for admission to a local Junior College after 10th grade exams

Many homeschooled children are taking the IGCSE exams at the tenth grade level [IGCSE/O Level] in India. Some of them would like to join Junior colleges in their respective states. What should they do to get admission into any Junior College in their state? What about the state of Maharashtra, and the Mumbai University?



These are the things that we are currently aware of in this respect:

IGCSE/O Level: Maharashtra State Board of Secondary and Higher Secondary Education states that students who have passed IGCSE/O Levels (minimum 5 subjects with English) are considered eligible for admission to the first year of Jr. College (Std. XI) affiliated to this Board.

http://recognition.cie.org.uk/OrganisationDetails.aspx?QI=2&RI=863 [This is from the Cambridge website. You can search for any Country and Exam here]

Tanya Valecha, the Principal of Rustomjee Cambridge IGCSE School in North Mumbai, Maharashtra, said “There is an equivalency booklet released by the Maharashtra state education department and available at their Navi Mumbai and Pune office. Not sure if it is available online. This book states all the boards from across the world which are equivalent to the SSC [Tenth grade State Board Secondary School Certificate] and in what context e.g.: 5 subjects at O levels with English is equivalent to SSC and the student is eligible for admission to a junior college in Maharashtra.

She also mentioned “For admissions to junior college, the following steps are taken by our students who write the IGCSE exam.

1. They need to apply online or offline in minority /in house quota at schools as per dates prescribed by the board.

2. They are issued the following documents from CIE – statement of marks, IGCSE certificate and migration certificate

3. They are issued the following documents by the school –

  • School leaving certificate,
  • Bonafide certificate and
  • Transcript of marks as per format of department.

4. If they apply for a diploma, they need to acquire an equivalency certificate from Navi Mumbai in their name.

5. If they do HSC, once the admission process is completed at a junior college, the student needs to fill up an eligibility form (available at college for a nominal fee) .and submit to his college

6. The college then proceeds and completes the process. The college may also write to school/board for verification.”

I found this form from Mumbai University for application for Provisional Statement of Eligibility for students from another Board or even another country seeking admission to Mumbai University:

http://www.mu.ac.in/eligibilityform.pdf

For those students wanting to take up professional courses, these are the requirements mentioned by some Universities like Manipal: Candidates intending to join Medical or Engineering degree programs are required to have obtained A Level passes in Physics, Chemistry and Biology/Mathematics besides five passes at GCE O Level/GCSE/IGCSE.

Figure 1 Homeschooling or teaching children at home is a growing trend in India

So as of now, homeschooled children in India taking the IGCSE exams at the tenth grade level should be able to get admission into Junior Colleges in Maharashtra [and other states also] by following the above steps.


Have a wonderful homeschooling learning journey. J If you need any clarifications please write to me.

PS:

I also found one Equivalency Booklet issued by a University in India online, http://gndu.ac.in/gndu2014/Downloads_pdf/eq_book.pdf

This form lists the Cambridge Exam as equivalent to the tenth grade exams.

There is also a Migration Certificate and an Equivalence certificate available online for those seeking admission for higher education: http://www.msbte.com/msbte_html/admins/files/stud_cen_act/Certificate_MIG_EQU_TRANS.pdf