Not all sunsets are spectacular

People can easily get the impression that others have impressive lives. Especially when they see the impressive pictures that others post. I have been guilty of posting impressive pictures of sunsets actually seen from my home.

Here are a few of them.

An actual sunset in north Mumbai

While sunsets do remind me of the magnificence of our creator, they can also provide an opportunity to show off.

July sunset scene in Mumbai

While there have been many magical moments, no doubt, I would like to say that most of the days are, well, not so spectacular.

Yellow and grey shades

In fact, most of the days the sky can be just plain and grey too.

Grey and dark clouds hover

At other times, the heavy brooding clouds can just descend in a heavy downpour within minutes.

I guess that I am trying to say here is that you need not envy anybody just because they can see some good sunsets.

God has made each one of us unique, just as no two sunsets will be alike. And the sunsets fade into night in a few hours. Let us live and love well in the brief time we have on earth. God bless

Published by Dr. S. P. Mathew

A Mumbai based practising Physician, passionate about God's wonderful creation, fitness and integral health, writer, activist and family man. Saved by God's Grace alone :-) to be his Ambassador

One thought on “Not all sunsets are spectacular

  1. In response I will post a part of Denison’s article:

    “A Prayer of Moses, the man of God”
    Our role in God’s drama of the ages (Ps 90:12)
    Psalm 90 is titled “A Prayer of Moses, the man of God.” It was apparently written as the Jewish people were preparing to enter Canaan together.
    Moses led them from Egyptian slavery through the Red Sea and forty years in the wilderness. He gave them the Ten Commandments and the rest of the Torah as God’s word and guidance for their lives and nation. He brought them through battles, rebellions, and hardships to the edge of their future in the land God intended for them.
    If we had met Moses forty years earlier, however, we would never have imagined that the last paragraph would be possible.
    A fugitive from Egyptian justice, he was keeping his father-in-law’s sheep in the wilderness. When God appeared to him and called him to liberate his people, Moses’ reply showed his astonishment: “Who am I that I should go to Pharaoh and bring the children of Israel out of Egypt?” (Exodus 3:11).
    But God had a plan for his life that Moses could not imagine at the time.
    Like Moses, you and I are created in God’s image (Genesis 1:27) with a unique role he intends for us in the drama he is directing through the ages.
    Our part in this drama is a present-tense calling with present-tense urgency. However long we live, our years “are soon gone, and we fly away” (Psalm 90:10). As a result, we must pray, “Teach us to number our days that we may get a heart of wisdom” (v. 12). Each day takes us one day closer to eternity.
    The fact that you and I are alive this morning is evidence that God has a plan and purpose for us. Each day is a new beginning in which we are invited to know our Lord and make him known with greater passion and purpose than ever before.
    Then, when our last day in this world comes, Christians can know that our death is only the doorway to life. As Jesus said, “Everyone who lives and believes in me shall never die” (John 11:26).

    Henri Nouwen was right: “Death is part of a much greater and much deeper event, the fullness of which we cannot comprehend, but of which we know that it is a life-bringing event. . . . What seemed to be the end proved to be the beginning; what seemed to be a cause for fear proved to be a cause for courage; what seemed to be defeat proved to be victory; and what seemed to be the basis for despair proved to be the basis for hope. Suddenly a wall becomes a gate.”

    Are you ready to step through that gate today? If not, why not?

    (By Jim Denison—- daily article dated September 21, 2020)

    From MPK Kutty

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