Pineapples are grown in Kerala on land used for rubber plantation by a group of people who usually rent out these lands from the owners. They plant the pineapple plants in between the rubber trees, use fertilizers and pesticides to ensure a big harvest of pineapples which will flower at the same time to enable bulk transportation and better profits.



I met a few rubber estate owners who had given their lands to such pineapple growers.

What they told me was rather disturbing.

They said that when they visited their rubber estates they could not endure the smell of chemicals there. They themselves were shocked at the amount of pesticides and chemicals these people use to ensure a big harvest of pineapples of large sizes. They never eat the pineapples grown on their land, they said. They prefer to take the small pineapples which they find growing in the wild.

After one harvest, the fields have to be cleared for the next planting.

Since labour is expensive, these pineapple growers use highly toxic chemicals to kill the remaining plants! They have also been using banned and notorious teratogenic and mutagenic chemicals which they have stockpiled in secret godowns and use in secret.

Wayanad is a fertile highland of blessed greenery in Kerala state. It is noted for its healthy environment of less atmospheric pollution compared to other parts of the state. Most of the people in Wayanad depend on agriculture for their living.

However, recently, in connection with the efforts of the banana-growing farmers to realize enhanced productivity, the unscientific and increased use of harmful pesticides is noted in the district. This trend, as expected, certainly resulted in the boosted production and profound profit, but according to recent surveys, this also resulted in the tragic increase in the number of cancer patients in the district. Among the pesticides used for the purpose, carbofuran, popularly known as Furudan in the market is the major one. http://shodhganga.inflibnet.ac.in/handle/10603/13244



So, when you see those juicy big pineapples, take care. Find out more about their origins. For your sake and for the environment’s.


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